BYU

I came back to Salt Lake yesterday.  Maybe I’ll come again tomorrow since it’s a holiday on Monday.
 
My study plan changed a bit during the first week of school.  After attending my geography and world religion classes, I decided that I didn’t really fit well in that environment — that is, being around foreigners who were in love with Asia — at least superficially; at least parts of Asia, to the exclusion of other parts that I was more concerned with.  (The "East Asian Geography" class in fact only covers China and Japan, and Korea incidentally; and there are no other Asian geography classes except "Southeast Asian".)  I want to go deeper than that…  After some brief deliberation I made up my mind to throw out my Asian Studies minor.  I couldn’t see any functional benefit in it, judging from my current career trajectory (I’m pretty sure I’ll just go back as an English teacher now).  Anyway, you learn a lot more about places by being in them than by taking classes about them in Provo.
 
After that, I was tweaking my schedule to try to get more hours available for working (BYU Catering, one of the larger campus employers, was willing to hire me).  Some opportunities arose to add some language classes, so I added 3rd-year Mongolian and 1st-year Vietnamese.  I’m "auditing" them, though, so I won’t receive a grade for them.  That gives me a lot more flexibility.  I don’t need those credits anyway.
 
I found a 400-level Linguistics class open that I was not yet qualified to enter, but the teacher told me that although he was hesitant about my lack of the pre-requisite class, he wouldn’t object if I wanted to join.  The same teacher later announced some employment positions for his English "corpus" ("body" of written words) project, so I got lined up with that, along with three other students (four others were already working on it).  In fact, I heard this teacher, Mark Davies, on BYU radio a year or three ago.  I used to listen to their classical music while doing Chinese deliveries, and I happened to hear him being interviewed on his earlier corpus work.  I’d thought it was moderately interesting…  Anyway, we’re only going to edit text files and scan documents in this job, nothing on a decision-making level.
 
So I’m set for this semester, anyway.  I’ll probably be finished with this beautiful place after next fall semester, 2010.
 
My roommates are decent.  The students down there are a bit rowdy sometimes, though.
 
I decided to start again on Facebook today after meeting my old LDSBC mates Norah and Petra in Provo yesterday.  Also, on this laptop of my mother’s, my MSN messenger account somehow still has an old contact list, with some old names…
 
It made me curious, you know.  After looking around Facebook a bit…  …I saw Bomie, and noticed she has a certain "relationship" status now.
 
…Oh well.  Good luck to her.
 
I mentioned before that for these three months in Mongolia, I prayed mostly for my mother, and secondly for my friend and sister Tugsuu, who’d helped me so much and inspired me to come…
 
Maybe Bomie’s none of my business anymore, but… of course… she was third.  She was so often in my prayers… that she might be given wisdom from yesterday, helped through today, and guided into tomorrow…
 
So I must believe that all things that are right for her will come to her.
 
…And I must believe that my smile, which left me those thirty-two months ago when she said goodbye, will someday return to stay.  I’ve been happy, especially this summer… but happiness just seems kind of strange when you can’t smile, or when your face muscles won’t hold and your smile so quickly fades away.
 
Everything, anyway, is new.  This is such a beautiful day of life.  I’m glad to keep waiting for whatever is ahead.
 
-Steve
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2 Responses to BYU

  1. Hannah says:

    hehe still want to be an english teacher in korea?

  2. Steve says:

    It\’s either Mongol or Korea… to begin with… -_- …Although I no longer know anybody in Korea…

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